It’s good to talk

After last week’s article (rant) about the Johnston Press photographic staff redundancies, I feel the need to chill and talk about something a little warmer and fluffier. I could have another rant, this time about the new powers UK police might soon have to seize press photographers’ images, but since there won’t be any press photographers left soon I suspect the law will be redundant by the time it hits the statute books.

I could have a rant about the latest European Union copyright review, which could very well be another attempt by big business to grab photographers’ rights, since these reviews never seem to centre on ways of strengthening copyright law. And on this matter, I urge all creatives to make submissions to the review, the deadline of which has been extended in to March 5th.

Yes, I could rant about all of that, but while rants get hits to my blog, it also gets boring. In any case it’s likely I’ll have to have another go at these subjects later, so rant lovers needn’t despair entirely.

Instead I’m going to tell you about a rather fun Friday evening last week when I addressed members of the Frome Wessex Camera Club and spent a couple of hours talking about the work I do now, and the experiences I had working for the News of the World from around 1998 to 2001 when I left abruptly due to unpaid expenses.

A milkman delivers a crate of milk to 10 Downing Street, London

Sitting overnight in Downing Street in case Cheri Blair went into labour, I captured a shot of the milkman delivering and broke the story that this delivery is a national secret

I’d not previously addressed a room full of people on this subject before, and it was kind of cathartic for me. I’d prepared a presentation with lots of photos from the period, each with its own back-story, and while I was nervous in the build up to the evening, once the house lights went down and I got started it was like I was flying. I’d made presenter notes, but barely referred to them for the entire talk. Everything just seemed to flow naturally.

Queen Elizabeth II rides out in a horse-drawn carriage at the start of the Trooping the Colour ceremony and parade in London in 2001, protected by a transparent umbrella to protect her from the rain

Some stories I covered were more conventional, such as Trooping the Colour, 2001

The audience of club members (plus my son who I’d dragged along under mild protest) did a very strange thing too; they laughed at my tales of celebrity chases, brushes with bodyguards and sitting in the backs of vans waiting so long for a particular scallywag to appear I’d have to pee in a bottle or risk blowing my cover.

A group of black ladies laugh heartily at the end of a march in honour of murdered teenager Damilola taylor

Marking the anniversary of the death of Damilola Taylor not with sadness, but unity and joy

And when the house lights went up at the end of the presentation, the image which will stay with me forever is the look on my son’s face because this was the first time he’d heard many of these stories. I’d assumed he would have been bored to tears, but his expression was a mixture of happiness and pride. Of everyone in the audience, he was my most important critic and it seems I passed the test.

Supporters of the National Front are escorted through the streets of Bermondsey by police officers.

A National Front march in Bermondsey, London. A lot less laughing and joy than the Damilola Taylor march which happened on the same day.

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4 comments

  • A great read Tim. Our nearest & dearest are those who very often miss out on hearing our tales. Your piece touched a chord with my own family. I guess there will come a time when they’ll be ready to hear my stories but that time has not yet arrived. So meanwhile I’ll continue to shoot and let the stories mount up. When the time is right, I’d hope my stories would get the same reaction – “his expression was a mixture of happiness and pride”. Regards, Tomas

    • Glass Eye February 4, 2014   Reply →

      Thank you, Tomas, I’m so pleased you enjoyed and related to my piece. My son asked afterwards why I’d never told him these stories and I explained that he wouldn’t have enjoyed them over the dinner table so much as when he could see the pictures and be in the company of others who were enjoying them too. Maybe you could write a book though! Cheers, Tim

  • laumerritt February 4, 2014   Reply →

    It must be very rewarding to see your soon being proud of your work as it would be for him understanding what his dad job consist of. Not every child, or dad for that matter, has that opportunity, lucky you!

    • Glass Eye February 4, 2014   Reply →

      Thanks, Lau. I must admit, I was quite surprised and touched by his reaction. I thought it would be a case of “oh, there goes dad again…” I’m pleased took him along now 🙂

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